November & NaNoWriMo | 2019

Hellooo there. Lovely day isn’t it?

Well, I’m back.

After being gone for a month, it’s strange returning, but let me start with my two main pieces of great news:

  1. I am alive.
  2. I wrote 50k words for NaNoWriMo with two hours to spare.

Yep.

That’s right. I survived NaNoWriMo without any prep beyond a list of things to include in the story (which the characters took the liberty of editing when I was off drowning in mashed potatoes and gravy, but we’ll return to that later)

Yes… no prep. Result?

The story smells like week-old cans smashed in a plastic bag and living in a bin outside and away from the house.

In other words: it is trash.

The plot is terrible, the world 2D, and the characters are all cardboard, and it’s not just because it’s a NaNoWriMo project.

I mean this is actually bad even for nano.

And that’s saying something.

Out of the 50k worth of events, only two – maybe five – things that have happened made me feel a little satisfied. And the story isn’t even finished. Meaning, it ended on a cliffhanger, but to be perfectly honest I had no idea what was coming next.

It was actually interesting how less stressful it was this year as compared to last one, when I was more invested and had plotted most of it before November even started.

Last year, every moment was about NaNoWriMo. I was thinking about writing. Living, breathing it. Plot holes piling everywhere I look and haunting me in my sleep, but this year, I honestly did not think about it unless I was sitting down in front of the computer with the document open.

And so on one hand, it was not as crazy, but on the other, I’m less satisfied with the content of the latter method.

Maybe it has to do with everything going on this November. There was a point where I was falling behind and getting too overwhelmed and gave up.

Completely and absolutely gave up.

There was debate going on over here, choir prep for our huge Christmas concert over here, family in town, school papers and prep for finals.

I decided that was it, which made my competitive side feel cheated and angry, but that was washed away with the flood of immediate relief.

For eight days straight, I never touched it. Instead I memorized my speeches, attended my scrimmage, did my schoolwork, and even got some time to enjoy some doodling.

And then everything changed.

I finished school two weeks early.

Out of the blue, I finished everything and found myself blinking at an empty to-do list. At which, I thought, hey. There is something I could fill all that white space with.

The conversation went something like this:

Answer:

Me:

At which point, I knew I would have to throw myself all in to catch up (you know catch up on *coughs* 20,000 words) so I went to my room, opened my closet, and pulled out my laptop.

It’s a serious thing to pull out my laptop, let me tell you.

My dad likes to say this laptop teaches the virtue of patience.

I like to say it’s the NaNoWriMo-er’s dream come true.

Or the procrastinator’s nightmare.

Look at it whatever way you want, but this tiny device I got used is so slow it can not process more than two (sometimes three if we’re lucky) things at a time. When I say things, I mean tabs open on a browser. Two programs – say the weather app and a browser – that kills it.

(The laptop also so light and small, it’s easy to walk around and type on at the same time, see? NaNoWriMo-er’s dream come true. FYI I’m selling it to the highest bidder, starting all the cost of all your books and mugs.)

In the end, it works like this:

  • Tab one: document with story.
  • Tab two: NaNoWriMo.

And I am here to tell you it works like magic (mixed with some coffee, chocolate, fellowly desperate writer-friends, and a stubborn nature)

And so on November 30th, right at 10 p.m. I reached 50,000 words.

And won.

And got this cool badge:

And this one:

Here’s how it ended up looking:

(the light blue line is the ideal spot to be every day for a casual and perfectly evened out win.)

My most written in one day was 8,537 words.

So I finished. Now what?

Like I mentioned, the word count goal was finished but the story was not. So do I plan to finish it?

The answer is, no not really.

Perhaps someday I will dig it out of the dumpster and completely start over with a new plot, some new characters, but the same seed of an idea and hope the mutation doesn’t happen again.

As I wrote November 30th at around 10:55 p.m. in my victory acceptance speech:

In the end, this is a jumble of confused sentences strung together with random items and phrases woven within. But do I care? Sure it is trash – I’d be the first to admit it – but I am happy with it for the single fact I won. Oh life, oh stress, oh busy days, where is your sting? I went ten full days without writing a word and yet I am the victor. I finish with a blast and blow the stress to bits, burn it it all to dust, and throw the ash into the four winds to be carried off by Euros. And so I plant my flag of victory of “50,009” into your throat and declare to all the world, I beat you oh monsters. How does that taste? The taste of defeat and shame. You have no hold on me. I wear the flag of victory.

Yes, in the end it is trash, and I will never go as far to even write a second draft, but I care not. Someday perhaps I might take the initial idea – that of the task of taking up a pen and writing about three hurt and broken people struggling to make sense of a broken world – that small glimmering jewel I took hold of for the first day and lost somewhere in the mist – but until there, small cardboard empire, wash away and erode into the murky sea. 

Good novel of NaNoWriMo 2019, I give thee leave to do it. In fact, until further notice, when I might take ye out for a laugh or a mighty cringe-attack, I command thee to collect dust in the utmost darkest corner of the valleys in my google drive.

Yeah. I was excited. 😛

Let’s look back and see what changed from what I did have in my brainstorming list of things to include. (list from before)

| outcasts |

Check!

Though my unique, wingless, outcast character stumbled somehow upon a wingless society which she fit into perfectly, and then the rest of the story happened there.

Yeah.

Don’t ask me where that country came from.

| fog monsters |

Yes! Though again. For some reason my characters aren’t actually frightened of them… even though they are extremely deadly… and they never truly show up even though they are amazing hunters…?

Maybe the fog monsters were on vacation.

| towering treehouse mansions |

Do you realize houses are hard to spread over multiple trees, because trees bend and shift in the wind?

And there’s lots of wind in my story.

So there are towering treehouse mansions, but there really shouldn’t be.

If I rewrite this thing sometime, it will be more of a Swiss Family Robinson with swinging bridges. Except that people who can fly don’t need bridges.

| old maps |

There were two. But they were just old maps. Nothing spectacular about them. I’m going to assume that I meant something more exciting by this in October…

| pirates |

Honestly, I forgot my old man was going to be an ex-pirate. He ended up just being a retired sailor with a tragic backstory.

| locked sea chests and riddles |

HA.

Nothing even close.

| angry mobs |

They weren’t angry.

Just silent and still. And kinda frightened.

| a quest (to what though I have yet to discover) |

Yeah sure. There were a couple quests.

But the main one I thought of in the first week (and the best one) fizzled out. 😛

| magical ship with no crew |

AH ha. Finally. Yes. There was a magical ship with no crew. Well. Depends on your definition.

Which brings us to what random things my characters did behind my back…

| ghosts |

I’m not even sure where these guys came from, but once the first showed up, the rest followed.

Including a whole host that haunts my poor, old (not pirate) man and the host that is rumored to run the magical ship.

Yeah.

But it gets worse.

| lost mc |

I’m not even joking. I legitimately have no idea what happened to my main character.

Is she on the boat? Or not? Because if she’s on the boat then there is no way back and she’s lost forever (not to mention maybe stuck with a bunch of ghosts), and if she isn’t, then where in the world is she? Because the other alternatives aren’t that pretty either.

Please someone help. I’ve lost a character, and this time it’s not on purpose.

(And now that a certain person will see this, she is not going to be super happy sooo)

ANYWAYS

On to the things I do have under control.

Right.


Other November Writings

Beyond my NaNoWriMo project, I did not write much. No poetry. No plot bunny attacks. No partially baked stories stuck back in the microwave.

Again, unlike last year when this big furry time-traveling monster wearing a trench coat and sunglasses kidnapped me for a couple days and held me at gun point until I wrote something for him.

The main thing beyond NaNoWriMo was compiling a list for 51 of

  1. major edits to enforce like filling in major plot holes, general renovations, character development, etc.
  2. minor things such as particular scenes I want to fix the feel of or things I need to research, and then
  3. people I hope will read it and give feedback.

In fact for a month dedicated for writing, there was a extremely small amount of time I actually wrote, but at the same time it felt very productive. I had been needing to compile that list for a while and will probably continue to add to it.


Random other achievements of November:

  1. Watched BBC Pride and Prejudice my sixth(?) time and wrote half a post on why it’s obviously better than the Keira Knightly version.
  2. Helped my family put on a English Country dance.
  3. Watched one of my older sisters die twice in Frankenstein the New Musical. (Was there an older musical?)
  4. Celebrated Thanksgiving twice.
  5. Made some earrings to sell at a craft fair.
  6. Baked some cookies with my little sister. Because. Christmas cookies.
  7. Listened to the This Beautiful Fantastic soundtrack non-stop. Except now Christmas music too.
  8. Watched The Matrix for the first time. (It’s amazing guys. Amazing.)
  9. Reorganized my bookshelf for the 50th time. (Yeah, I’m slightly obsessed with doing that.)
  10. Raked leaves.
  11. Lost at the strategy game I am renowned for winning. 😔 (Any Seven Wonder Duel fans out there?)

And now I’m wondering how to present the title of a game. Italicized? In quotation marks?

Anywho.

In conclusion, writing a book is a fun and crazy experience, and I had an amazing break that thoroughly enjoyed.

And oh.

Did you do NaNoWriMo? How did it go? What’s your next step with your novel?

One Down, More to Go || novel celebrations, considerations, and introductions

Let’s ignore last week.

Because skipping out on blogging to go on a field trip is nothing in comparison to my news of this week.

Are you ready for it?

It’s kina big.

Just kinda.

Are you ready? Okay here it is:

I have finished 51.

Wait.

Say WHAT

I’m DONE?!?

…and in the meantime all the rest of you are wondering why in the world it has taken this high schooler to finally learn how to count to 51.

No, its not because I’m homeschooled (thank you very much)

It’s because “51” is the title of what use to be my W.I.P. (which work-in-progress for those wondering).

Though to be honest it’s still a work-in-progress, but we’ll get to that later.

For now, confetti! Balloons! Cake!

In order to celebrate I will be ranting, rambling, and well. More rambling. Gifs.

And watching hobbits celebrate my great feats.

All that jazz.

But first, for those lost: 51? The initial seed of an idea was planted last November when I needed a break from NaNoWriMo (you know that thing where you write 50,000 words in a month) and so asked a writer-friend for a short story prompt so… I could write even more…?

I know it doesn’t make much sense, but wait until you are cranking a couple thousand words a day for the same project.

You get kinda tired of it. Especially the end of the second week. (Which is the point you decide that there are dragons in your world.)

NoNaWriMo in seven words:

Well I wrote a couple thousand words of a short story that felt more like a novel. I started plotting. I wrote a couple pages on how time-traveling might work and how it would effect users. By the end of those pages, I had met my characters. They had brought to me their problems, which I prodded and poked and plotted from.

Since then it has grown. It has had its highs and lows. Things developed and changed. Including the method of story-telling.

All until last week. I finished at the personal-award-winning length of over 75,500 words (what a big plump rabbit that plot bunny has become!).

It’s an experience.

Everytime I finish a novel, I sit back and stare as I try to swallow the fact that I just wrote “the end,” and I think, “Wow, maybe I do know how to do this writing-thing…”

And then I close it and step away. An hour later it hits me. When I’m scheduling maybe. Or passing the computer. Or unconsciously hurrying through chore because of those 1,000 words waiting to be written. Suddenly the mindset is shattered.

There dumps that all confusing but amazing sense of joy, sadness, relief, fear, and confidence. And then that renewed energy.

All of a sudden, it is done. I did it and as comma-depraved and pitiful the prose is and as sagging as the plot proves to be with every chapter, it is mine. All the sweat and mental circles I ran, the sleepless nights I poured into it, the long afternoons squinting at the pixels blinking back at me. All the scrawling’s in my school notebooks. All the holes I must have drilled into my wall as I sat at my desk oblivious of humanity and the schoolbooks before me.

But wait…

Done?

Actually done?

And that original fondness and excitement you had for the characters? It was never lost, merely muddled with the day-to-day grind. And you will no longer visit them.

At least not like this. Not like how it’s been.

It will never be the same with them.

All those problems they brought you have meddled away your summer with. And they’re less of a jerk for it too.

Maybe it will never be the same, but I will be returning. After a break I plan to edit a lot, starting with all those filler {ELEPHANT}s and {helicopter flight check?}s that I stick in when I don’t have time to research. And that I forgot about until handing it to a friend.

I always finish a novel with renewed vigor. When I sit down to write I find myself pulling out the upbeat tunes to dance through as I rip apart pages and scribble with red pens. Or something like that. 😉

Well summer is now gone. Fall has already arrived with all its luggage: Shorter days. School. Cold. Flaring colors.

And then another revelation rocks my little universe.

NaNoWriMo is just two weeks away.

And yep.

I’m doing it.

How could I not? Last year was fantastic and after spending almost the past year just on one novel, skipping from section to section, rewriting, and overthinking sometimes, I feel like a good rush of new words and ideas, and that feeling of defenestrating perfectionism and care. Kidnapping a couple new characters and also holding my inner editor for ransom.

Look sometimes you just have to write a random novel and that’s the truth.

*and everyone says amen*

I felt quite lost the other day realizing I have no idea what I was going to write. That since of complete loss. Overwhelming nothing-ness. There is a huge difference between a new chapter in a book, and starting a new book. Facing that blank white page with no history.

Suddenly all that confidence about knowing what I’m doing?

Out the window.

And suddenly I’m sitting at the computer wandering what the temperature is outside.

Where is inspiration when you need it?

Well, after waiting for a sudden creative revelation to hit for a week I gave up only to be most pleasantly bombarded by Eden.

How can you say no to her inspiring bubbliness? Or the prodding by a couple other people I had kinda convinced to do NaNo in the past hundreds of flocks of other eager writing friends. Well she came up with some ideas, which I absolutely loved and twisted together into something I hope will be digestible.

And so now the minor dumping…

Short Teaser

She was born without wings. He was born deaf. And the man was cursed, but he was not born that way.

Hopefully that mini dwarf blurb left you with a couple questions. (Or at least made you want to know more.)

Winged people a norm?

…and now thinking about it, I’m starting to grow extremely excited, scared, and about ten other emotions.

Want to hear more?

What else this novel will include*

  • outcasts
  • fog monsters
  • towering treehouse mansions
  • old maps
  • pirates
  • locked sea chests and riddles
  • angry mobs
  • a quest (to what though I have yet to discover)
  • magical ship with no crew

{*Disclaimer: This is by no means a complete list and is in fact only a list by the author. It has yet to be pitched to the characters. It is very much subject to change. Thank you. 😉 }

Extra Fluff

I tried my hand at making character collages/inspiration-boards…

Cora:

Salar:

And Azo:

And with that I think my introduction is complete-

Wait… I need a title?

You’re saying most books have titles? And ones not just randomly pulled from the number of playlists I have on Spotify? *cough51cough*

Okay confession. I’m terrible at naming books especially when I have no idea what they are about especially out of thin air.

I promise 51 is firstly: not about aliens. And secondly: relates to the story. And thirdly: no I don’t have 51 playlists anymore.

(Don’t look at me like that. You go count your playlists. They multiply like rabbits.)

Well, we will work on that one.

WELL

And that’s that.

You think the party is done though? Never. 😉

Chalice tagged me for this really cool music tag so return next week for another dose of ramblings, this time about music.

Prepare to be drenched.

Until next time, let the joyous hobbits dance!

~ evelyn ~

**all gifs extracted by my personal crew of dwarves from the mines of giphy**

a little post named “random”

Have you ever just wanted to write for the sake of writing?

Nothing planned. Nothing plotted.

After a long day of pounding out papers and scratching out math equations, just you and your thoughts winding out slowly onto the page, forming little splotches of black on white.

The itch comes every once and a while for me. A little itch to be wild and dreamy with some prose; to make some words purr with my wandering ponderings and watch them stretch out and then curl up before the fire.

Maybe EvEn BREAK the RUles and cApitAlIzE in STRANGE wAys

like I use to get away with.

Well, the itch has come today, and I’m afraid I will indulge myself in satisfying it with a scratch.

I might ending up sounding a little philosophical. I might end up sounding a little poetical. Maybe silly. Who knows, but are any of those bad things?

Already I’ve made some alliteration for the sake of alliteration. I’ve sprinkled in some personification and metaphors, and stirred in a tasty verb or two.

Art is easy to compare to soup.

You dump in a little of this and a little of that, like Amelia Bedelia baking up her lemon meringue pie, and then watch the colors swirl. Add a pinch of seasoning, and take a deep breath of the spicy smell.

You make mistakes. You learn to differentiate the walnuts from the pecans, the salt from the sugar, and the vinegar from the water. You learn there’s a reason they tell you to stir your concoction and that there’s a reason they say to set timers on ovens.

There is something unmatchable about learning from trial and error. It is personal and it is physical, unlike that advice found on scraps of paper books. These lessons learned have scars to prove it.

Well this past month was Camp NaNoWriMo and I learned a few things.

When you have a complicated time-traveling plot that twists and turns on itself, you might want to plot it out in greater detail before diving straight in.

Who knew my six pages on the workings of time-traveling would not be enough? Maybe I should have written more than half a page on the actual plot?

I reached 23,000 words about two and a half weeks into April, but the story was falling apart. There was also a lack of unique creativity that I was trying to go for. Plus I had yet to discover how it would end. Though that is typical when I start a project, at 23,000 words in I usually want to know before continuing. I brainstormed and brainstormed and brainstormed, but I could not work it out.

At that point, I was going to essentially burn it to ashes and then throw those out the window, but my oldest brother was visiting for the week and we began talking about it. Suddenly, explaining the plot, I began questioning my decision: Wait, what am I thinking? I love this story! I love these characters! Why give up on them??

Well, thankfully, said brother came to the rescue and gave me a good picture of what happens in my story, giving insight and blowing my mind!

Yes… a picture. Literally.

img_0837

There, doesn’t that clear everything up?

One of my other brothers saw it sitting out the other day and asked, “Were you guys just destressing?”

No, I promise that graph makes sense to me.

Two words: Time travel.

So, at the moment, instead of throwing out the lovely, tangled manuscript, I will lock it up and wait for it to gather some dust, and until then I will work on fleshing out some timelines and charting the plot.

I also want to brainstorm different ways to tell the story. I was having trouble telling such a complicated plot through my third person narrative. (Maybe time to try the fun of rambling in my character’s personas?) Well, I have a couple ideas up my sleeves.

Beyond all that, I discovered that even the worst of times can be turned into great art!

Frantically finishing finals” is an amazing alliteration, don’t you agree? 😉

Now they are officially done! *throws confetti*

…but I have some math to catch up on. Sooo… *gathers up confetti to save until that glorious day of true freedom*

But! Tuesday was the one year anniversary of The Flabbit Room’s Ildathore project. *throws confetti again*

I might say something more about my writing family, but it would end up being a mix between sappy sentences and a incoherent jumble of inside jokes.

So, instead let me delight over my Google drive folders which I discovered can be colored!

 

ALL THE COLORS

 

Isn’t that just amazing??

Well, fare thee well, friends! I wiLL REturN neXt wEEk for mor chicken fun.

~ tA-Ta-fOr-NoW! ~

 

Tags Galore!

In an age of needing to write 3000 words per day on a novel, tags come in handy for blogging. Thanks Ariel for the well-timed taggings!

Both of these tags are focused around characters, and so let’s dive right in!

 

Tag #1  – The Heroes of Legend

Rules:

  1. Very graciously thank the blogger who tagged you. (Thank you Ariel! :)).
  2. Answer the following ten questions in the tag. Images of your characters are encouraged, but not necessary.
  3. You may only use Original Characters (OCs) for this tag. As expected.
  4. Characters from fairytale retellings are not allowed. Because then that would be too easy.
  5. Explain why your character matches the description, because if you don’t, that would not be fun.
  6. MAKE SURE YOU KNOW WHAT YOU’RE DOING. Do not hurt your little babies in this process.
  7. Link back to Merie’s blog post where she started the tag.
  8. Tag a few other bloggers to play this game too! (And make sure they’re writers… because if you tag a non-writer to do this one, it would be really awkward.)

Can I first comment on how glad I’m not given an exact number of bloggers to tag? I’m very grateful. Trying to find eleven people who haven’t participated yet is always the hardest part. xD

The Questions

1. Who is a character that is most likely to be turned into a frog (and then thrown against the wall because of additional obnoxiousness)?

I’d say this depends on who has the ability to turn people into frogs. First person to come to mind though, would be Matthew, a bratty street kid from my first (and unnamed) fantasy novel, which has been retired to a cardboard box in the back of a dusty (virtual) closest. He’s the kind of kid that doesn’t understand compassion, and tries to be sassy and clever.

Yes, indeed. Quite annoying.

2. A character that could probably persuade a man–sent to kill them on pain of death– not to kill them, through charisma or charm alone (or manipulation, whichever way you take it)?

Ooooh. I’d say Arvia as a child. Just too sweet and innocent.

3. Who is that kind of person who waves around a weapon (or other sharp pointy object) everywhere they go, regardless of their skill in handling it (which is to say, probably quite doubtful)?

That would be Chris from my novel, Beyond the Will. He would have no idea how to use a weapon – any weapon – but to order to stay on top of things, he would fake it until he makes it.

Or until he fails.

4. Who can endure the most pain with a stoic, completely neutral face (maybe s/he’s dancing)?

Are we talking emotional or physical pain? 😉

I would say Charlie, from my WIP, 51. She is stubborn, optimistic, and stable enough. It’s the pain of others she would not be able to endure.

5. Who is most likely to pull off a Hua Mulan and face a trial as one of the opposite gender if need arises?

Oh, um. Hmm.

6. A character who would be quickest to obey a talking cat when it demands them to buy it a pair of boots?

That would be Arvia as a child again. Arvia lives by the sea, free to wander, dance, and sing. If a talking cat showed up, she won’t even consider doubting it’s existence.

7. Who would be willing to do anything– absolutely anything– in order to rescue someone s/he loves (includes killing innocent foxes and asking the moon for help)?

Ethan, from the aforementioned, unnamed fantasy novel. No spoilers, but he does a lot to rescue his little sister. 😉

8. A character who seems to stubbornly not die no matter what you put them through (if you haven’t tried the Big Bad Wolf, now’s the time)?

Ha.

I’m going to pick Matthew again. This poor kid… He actually was created because a couple years a friend of mine asked me to put her brother in my book and kill him off as a joke. xD

I said sure! I can do that. Sounds fun!

So I planned to have him 1) betray everyone 2) live a miserable life filled of loneliness and guilt and then after a good amount of that 3) I’d eventually kill him off.

But then Matthew stubbornly refused, turned out nothing like my friend’s brother, and did all the wrong things. He wouldn’t go where I told him, and much less betray my main characters (at least at that time… it just wasn’t his way), and then he insisted on getting dragged along on the journey. (And pretending he didn’t want to. ;))

So, yeah.

He’s still alive.

For now. 😉

9. Who is the terrifyingly malicious, extra-megalomaniacal, wildly unpredictable Queen of Hearts/Bluebeard villain (the kind that makes you want to run and hide)?

My cliched villains of my first full length book: again the unnamed fantasy novel. I promise I didn’t copy the Nazgul. At least not consciously.

“The Riders,” dressed in black, rode black horses and could turn into black vultures.

And, believe me, not those kind of vultures that sit around and sing about friendship. 😉

10. Who is a character that is the terrifyingly placid, blood-freezingly calm, monotone-voiced villain that is Every Fairytale Villain in History Incarnate (the kind that makes you want to run and hide)?

I don’t think I have a single monotoned villain. They either hiss, or yell, or shriek, or roar. And sometimes whisper. But never monotone.

 

Tag #2 – The Star Wars Character Tag

Rules:

1. THERE ARE NO RULES.

Oh dear. The paradox.

2. Refer To Number 1.

Thank you kindly.

3. There is one absolute rule: You MUST use your own characters (OCs) for this tag. (Brownie points if you add pictures of your characters.)

Hmm. I’m getting such mixed signals here… no rules? Rules? Rules that say there are no rules?

4. The Sorta Rule: Scream a huge thank you to whoever tagged you for this whilst treating them to a pizza dinner at your favorite pizza chain.

Oh dear, now, I’m really trapped….

5. The Kinda Rule: Include This Link In The Post So That The Penny Can Read Everyone’s Answers To This Smol Strange.

6. The Rule That’s Not Really A Rule But It Would Be Great: Include the graphic and tag at least three Jedi or Sith Lords.

Tagging Jedi? This is getting harder and harder. xD

Heading
Requested Graphic ;P

Okay! Let’s get started with the questions!

 

1. Who’s Your Obi Wan Kenobi? (sassy, a great mentor, but can be a bit strict)

Closest I can think of is either Walter, from 51, or Seth from The Unnamed Fantasy Novel. Walter would be pretty strict and a great mentor, but not as sassy as Seth, who would be a worse mentor, due to anger and disgust issues toward the kids he’s stuck with. (Don’t judge him… one of those kids is Matthew.)

2. Who’s Your Leia Organa? (feisty, incredible comebacks, and does their own thing)

Allie. One of the twins in Paper Adventures. She’s got quite a spirit and likes to tease her brother endlessly.

3. Who’s Your Finn? (overeager, adorable, a cinnamon roll)

Yes, I’m about to compare Finn to my villain’s pet. 😉

Doodle Pup is definitely overeager and adorable. He’s the companion of the villain from my novel Paper Adventures, which is taking a break from the editing stage at the moment. He’s not exactly a dog, but a simplistic cartoon of a dog (meaning a oval with four stick legs) who is green and wears both a tie and a top hat.

4. Who’s Your Padmé? (kind, loving, but also kick butt)

Charlie again. Very kind and loving, but also spunky and sarcastic, with a fierce passion for justice and for protecting others.

5. Who’s Your Count Dooku? (deliciously evil, extra, and sick burns)

A certain character from 51. 😉

6. Who’s Your BB-8? (too cute, everyone loves them, can do no wrong)

What if I go with Arvia’s baby brother, Adrian, this time? xD

7. Who’s Your Yoda? (underestimated, extra, and wise)

This was the hardest question yet.

I’m going to go with Erath from my short story, Into The Forest. She’s pretty young, but don’t let that misguide you. She filled with a surprisingly amount of strength and courage.

8. Who’s Your Anakin Skywalker? (bratty, rebellious, whiny)

*coughs*

Matthew.

Remember him?

9. Who’s Your C3-PO? (always worrying, gives depressing information, constantly wailing)

Miss Agnes from my novel, Beyond the Will.

She has got to be one of my favorite characters to write. She gets away with saying things I couldn’t.

Agnes’s lips pressed together tightly and she set her cup down. “Chris, right?” He nodded. “You’re here for the funeral?” He nodded again. “Well, thank goodness that man’s gone. The world’s a better place now.”

Chris coughed uncomfortably. “I… I never met him.”

“Of course,” she snapped. “Any good parent would keep their innocent little child away… though it didn’t seem to help in your case. I assume you got your piggish, sugar-gobbling tastes from him too?”

^ case in point ^

 

10. Who’s Your Luke Skywalker? (hero, has been through a lot, has their share of flaws)

Zebulon, another character from my Camp NaNoWriMo project, 51. He has his flaws for sure and has been through a lot (though nothing compared to what is up my sleeves muhahaha). No spoilers, but his past actually has a lot to do with the story. 😉

 

And that’s all of the questions. Now for passing them on to others!

I tag…

Dekreel @ Inky RambleBeast

N.C. Stokes @ Weird As Usual

and

Bethany @ Shastin’s Notebook

 

So, I’m actually going to add a question to whichever tag(s) you choose to take. Have you ever written a friend/family member/acquaintance into your story? Why? And how did that go?

If busy (or simply in the mood) feel free to say we’re playing two hand tag and that I only managed to catch you with one. 😉

Until next Friday!

~ evelyn ~

2019 Camp NaNoWriMo Update // week 2

I had this strange moment of realization this week.

All day I had been curling up in my cardigan to work on school in the freezing basement, but then, when I was called to help bring in groceries, to my surprise I stepped outside only to find it sunny and warm.

I guess spring has finally come. 🙂

Over this past weekend, my family took a trip to Philadelphia to watch my older siblings compete in the National College Mock Trial Competition. I decided to pack no school, and brought some books to read and then my laptop for some NaNoWriMo writing.

Long car drives are the best, in my opinion. It’s just fun family time to cruise the country, listen to music, and play those car-trip games, that range from writing poetry to keeping track of license plates spotted to reciting Shakespeare lines.

Or it’s a nice time to just read a book. 😉


 

{stats}

Day 5: 1314 words

Day 6: 964 words

Day 7: 1727 words

Day 8: 1261 words

Day 9: 887 words

Day 10: 697 words

Day 11: 1783 words

 

That leaves my overall word count at 14,480 while I should be around 19,000 words. Hopefully I’ll catch up over upcoming Easter break! 🙂


 

{poetry}

I couldn’t pick out a favorite sentence written this week, but I have another small poem to share. I picked this one out because the world is finally waking from winter. The trees seemed to blossom over night and the grass is suddenly green again.

Change

Sweet summer slips into the Fall.

Fall drops to make way for the snow.

But winter turns into the spring,

So not all change is bad, you know.


 

I hope you have a wonderful day!

~ evelyn ~

2019 Camp NaNoWriMo Update // week 1

A week has passed and I’m back!

Besides having a sore throat and only getting in 61 words the first day, NaNo has been going pretty well! I made up for the slow start the next day and have been keeping up for the most part.

I actually started writing this novel before I decided to use it for Camp NaNoWriMo, so I had 3271 words already so technically the rough draft for my novel, 51, is currently 9118 words long. However, that doesn’t count towards my 50,000 in a month goal.

This means I have to constantly practice my subtraction skills, but on the bright side! I’m getting faster at deducing 3271 from a given amount. 😉


 

{this week’s stats}

Day 1: 61 words

Day 2: 3307 words

Day 3: 1954 words

Day 4: 525

Today: none yet, but hopefully lots. (:

Total: 5847 words

 


 

{favorite sentence written this week}

With what I have so far with this project it was hard to choose a favorite. Last year for NaNoWriMo I had too many options to pick from. Snippets of dialogue like “Some people are better observed from afar,” and “The buttons are calling,” fought for that special award.

But this week, no sarcastic or eccentric characters have been released into my main character’s life.

Yet. 😉

Anyways, here’s what I picked out: “Like dust that blows and settles, so can a life be stirred with the winds of change.”


 

{life}

I got another plant! Actually three new ones.

img_0503
From left to right: Priscilla, Ferdinand, and Isabella

I also volunteered at my local library for the first time!

It was strangely relaxing. Just me shelving books in a quiet building for an hour and a half. A very a nice break little break from the rush of school and NaNoWriMo.

I even had some extra time, so I picked up and read through The Letters of Father Christmas by J.R.R. Tolkien.

It was amazing and so sweet. 100% recommended. 🙂


 

{poetry}

And finally, April is national poetry month, and so I thought I would share some with you.

I’d say that my poetry typically falls under two different categories: thoughtful and serious, resulting from when I sit to think something through, or silly and playful, inspired by something I’ve experienced with younger siblings.

My Shadow falls under the latter category, and I wrote it last year, when I experimented a lot with limerick-type patterns.

I hope you enjoy!


 

My Shadow

There is a little person,

Who follows me around,

Both day and night,

Both left and right,

Without a single sound.

 

I tried to hide away from him,

And underneath the bed,

But with the light,

It was still bright,

And so he followed where I led.

 

I hadn’t given up yet,

I’d lose him in the woods,

Ran back and forth,

Both south and north,

But he was quick and good.

 

Giving up and very mad,

I showed him to my mother

But she just sighed:

And then replied:

“Timmy dear! Sam just likes his big brother!


 

Camp NaNoWriMo // of goals and projects and lessons learned from the last time

April is approaching.

I can see the light of summer break at the end of the tunnel and the chapters left in my school books are decreasing, but then here comes Camp NaNoWriMo.

For those you don’t know, Camp NaNoWriMo is the summer version of NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) where writers go nuts, trying to write an entire novel in 30 days.

The key difference is that for the “camp” you get to set your own goal. Whether it be only 5,000 words or writing for a certain amount of hours each week, you get to pick.

Despite the fact that the first two weeks of April are pretty packed with school projects, and even a trip out of town, I want to challenge myself and thus decided to try for 50,000 words again.

I barely made it in November (mainly because I ran out of things to write ha) but I made it nevertheless, had fun, and learned a lot.

Despite popular belief, professional authors don’t just sit down and write their perfect prose or brilliant plots first try. There is always that terrible first draft – or that “sloppy copy,” as my grandma says – that ends up being drowned beneath a pile of notes and edits.

I had struggled for so long with understanding that. I would stare at the screen in frustration, trying to pound out just one sentence to satisfy the standard I set. I would reorganize the words, then delete them, then type them all back again. It was both exhausting and depressing.

However, when you have only thirty days to write the entire thing, suddenly the time to be picky disappears. If I was going to survive NaNoWriMo I knew I was going to have to throw perfectionism out the window. It forced me to do it.

And I went from spending a year and a half on a first draft, to twenty-five days.

Now, I hope to pull it off again!

For Camp NaNoWriMo,  I will be writing (and I thought I was never say this) a sci-fi, time-traveling novel. Or at least I will be attempting to. 😉

The idea behind it all started when I was writing some quick flash fiction in November (during NaNoWriMo, in fact) and then I began wondering what it would be like emotionally for someone to actually be a time-traveler.

A few hours later I had typed up a total of six pages on the topic. Six pages of me just musing about it.

A nice little, six-page plot bunny.

Thankfully, once all the ideas that had been bouncing around my head were neatly outlined in a document, I was able to set it aside and get back to work on my NaNoWriMo project and focus without another distraction.

Since November, though, I have continued to brainstorm, flesh out characters, and sketch a plot as the sudden late-night inspirations hit. I scrawl them out on a scrap of paper I had been using as a bookmark or in the margins of my algebra homework.

The past couple weeks, I have been compiling them in preparation for Camp NaNo. Now my character notes filed in easy reach, and my scribblings on the plot points translated and typed from a gleeful mass of names and verbs into something legible.

So here I present for your scrutiny, a mock cover and blurb for my (hopefully) soon-to-be written novel, 51.


 

51_Mock Cover_2

Zeb was going to change the world.

He was on his way to the largest, most elite school of science, prepared to discover cures, build machines, and ultimately help those in need.

But the day before he was bound to leave, his father was shot by a man who vanished without a trace. And left in his hand was the note:

“No one lives past fifty here.”

 


 

Camp NaNoWriMo, here I come.

Until next week!

~ evelyn ~